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Food Tasting Experience to Study Different Beliefs

March 2018

Food Tasting Experience to Study Different Beliefs

Students enjoyed a range of Kosher food.

Students in Year 8 at King James have been learning how religion can have an influence on people’s identities.

As part of their Religious Studies course, students have been developing their understanding of different religions and cultural beliefs. They have been looking closely at how food is of huge importance in the Jewish faith, as well as studying the significance of Baptism for Christians and modest dressing for the Muslim community. Learning about diverse religions allows our students to appreciate many different identities and values; this is something about which the Academy feels strongly.

After studying various aspects of the Jewish faith, students focused on the significance of Kosher food in the religion. Kosher, derived from the Hebrew ‘appropriate’, refers to food that is deemed suitable for a member of the Jewish community to eat, meaning that it conforms to the regulations of ‘Kashrut’ (dietary law). The observance of Kosher has been a hallmark of Jewish identity for thousands of years and it continues to be a part of every day life in the Jewish community.

To help students develop an understanding of what the Kosher laws cover, they first looked at the ingredients of foods such as chocolate, matzo crackers for Passover, grape juice, macaroon sweets and cakes, before enjoying a food tasting experience. This hands-on approach to learning offered an opportunity to develop their Religious Studies knowledge in a way that leads to a deeper understanding.

Through investigating the traditional heritage of Kosher, students now recognise how religions such as Judaism can influence people’s identity. They are also able to apply that knowledge to a range of beliefs and recognise the diversity of identities in today’s society.

Article and photograph by Year 13 student, Emily H

King James I Academy, South Church Road, Bishop Auckland, County Durham DL14 7JZ